Tag Archives: Ottawa

The Newest Jack Meter Novel is here!

Meter Parents, the newest in the Jack Meter Case Files  SF Mystery series, is now out and is available in Trade Paperback and ebook for Kindle and Nook.

Jack is suddenly stuck with babies. But are they really babies, or an expendable tool for someone else’s revenge?

Jack Meter’s hard-won peace is about to be shattered again. Two fugitives have descended on his apartment and are demanding help. They’re Phoenixes, a species that start as babies in the morning, age through the day and vanish after sunset, only to be reborn the next day.

Then there’s the Kayzar. The aliens want the Phoenixes back and are willing to kill anyone to recapture them, including Jack.

The Phoenixes’ story doesn’t ring true to Jack, but what’s a PI to do when his home is invaded, his friends feel sorry for the refugees, and he has a dead Kayzar stinking up his apartment?

The family is the test of freedom; because the family is the only thing that the free man makes for himself and by himself.— G. K. Chesterton

Read a sample.

“Jack Meter stays smart, sexy, and darkly funny—despite a new crop of aliens messing with his life. M.D. Benoit’s fast-paced and unique blend of science fiction and hardboiled detective will keep fans of both genres eagerly turning pages!” –Sherry D. Ramsey, editor of The Speculative Elements series

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Meter Parents published

Meter Parents

Jack is suddenly stuck with babies. But are they really babies, or an expendable tool for someone else’s revenge?

Jack Meter’s hard-won peace is about to be shattered again. Two fugitives have descended on his apartment and are demanding help. They’re Phoenixes, a species that start as babies in the morning, age through the day and vanish after sunset, only to be reborn the next day.

Then there’s the Kayzar. The aliens want the Phoenixes back and are willing to kill anyone to recapture them, including Jack.

The Phoenixes’ story doesn’t ring true to Jack, but what’s a PI to do when his home is invaded, his friends feel sorry for the refugees, and he has a dead Kayzar stinking up his apartment?

The family is the test of freedom; because the family is the only thing that the free man makes for himself and by himself.— G. K. Chesterton

Read a sample.

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Expat Harem

A year ago through Twitter, during a discussion on literature at #litchat, I met a fantastic woman, Anastasia Ashman, a US expatriate living in Turkey. She was talking about her new book, Tales from the Expat Harem, and anthology of stories written by expatriate women living in modern Turkey. Tales evolved into a huge project and blog, a “neocultural hub for global citizens, identity adventurers, Turkophiles, identity travelers and culturati of all types.” It is a place where “common interest + experience defines us better than geography, nationality — or even blood.”

Expat Harem has its regular contributors but also visiting ones. I am such a one, discussing the feeling of being an expatriate in my own country because of differences in language, culture, behavior. The in-country expat forced me to inspect and introspect what it meant for me to live in a different culture, and it reinforced the empathy I feel for all new immigrants to our country, and to my town.

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Worldwide Sculptures

Policeman I’ve always been fascinated by sculpture, from ancient times to today. There’s room for abstract in this medium but I find it’s at its best when it is representational, and when it sends a message. I stumbled on 33 Weird Statues and Sculptures Around the World from toroller.com.

What strikes me is the difference in, shall I say, boldness between European and American sculptures, in topic and in content. No way would a fifteen foot vulva be displayed in a prominent park in Canada or the United States, although I could see it in some South America States.

What does that say about us? That we are more prudish? That we have better taste? That we are more limited in our art appreciation? That our governments have less courage?

On the other hand, maybe Europe is more broad-minded only when it comes to the secular. Terence Koh’s sculpture of an erect Jesus has created an uproar (“Christ is risen!” said the Sun). Hmmm. Although he was supposedly fashioned as man’s image, that part of the plumbing wasn’t supposed to work. He obviously wasn’t a perfect god.

Sarcasm aside, and religion aside, it is still interesting to think that our city’s sculpture may be a reflection of who we are as a people, or, more likely, who our government is. In Ottawa, our sculptures are mostly of dead, important political people. Perhaps fitting, since we are the capital of Canada, but oh, so boring.

Not surprising for a city that stows its sidewalks (metaphorically, of course) at 10pm on a Saturday night.

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