Tag Archives: ebooks

February: Zumaya Thriller Month Kindle Sale

From Zumaya Publications:

For the month of February, Zumaya will be placing Thrillers and other genre work with thriller elements on SPECIAL!

All the titles below will be listed at the low price of $2.99. A great way to try out these great authors and fill out your Kindle libraries.

Week 1 Feb 5 – Feb 11 – Science Fiction Thrillers

 
 
Blood Line by Lynn Ward – Sample
Unforced Error by Mark Roberts – Sample
Catalyst by M D Benoit – Sample

Week 2 Feb 12 to Feb 18 – Thrillers

 
 
Final Mercy by Frank J Edwards – Sample
Redacted by G L Rockey – Sample
Too Many Secrets by Linda Guyan
Resurrection Diva by Eva Batonne –  Sample

Week 3 Feb 19 to Feb 25 – Fantasy Thrillers

 
 
The Mirror of Yu-Huang by Christine Norris – Sample
Vassal of El by Gloria Oliver – Sample

Week 4 Feb 26 to Mar 3 – Mixed Thrillers

 
 
The Ugly Princess by Elizabeth K Burton – Sample
Dark Legend by Chris Stires – Sample
Murder Canyon by Joan Blacher
P.S. All these listed titles are actually on sale from 5 February 2012 to 3 March 2012. We just have certain ones features each week.
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Name the bear

From Elizabeth Burton –

Twenty-odd years ago, my mom bought me a little white wizard bear at an after-Christmas sale. When I joined Zumaya Publications, he/she became our unofficial mascot.

Now, we’re going to make the bear our OFFICIAL mascot, but he/she needs a name. So, for the next month, until ArmadilloCon 33 in August here in Austin, send us your suggestions for what to name the bear. If your name is chosen, we’ll send you a new Kindle loaded with Zumaya ebooks and some other cool swag or a terrific computer attache full of signed Zumaya paperbacks—your choice. We’ll give prizes to the nine runners-up, too.

Send your suggestion to zumayaebooks@gmail.com; please include your address with your entry. Entries will be judged by a panel of Zumaya authors and the winner announced on August 28th. You may enter as often as you like, but you must be 13 years old or more to enter. Sorry–legal stuff. And Zumaya authors and their immediate families will have to forego the fun, too. I’ll make it up to y’all, I swear.

Let the contest begin!

Here’s a picture

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The Espresso Book Machine

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Increasingly, discussions about thee EBM center around the possibility that this ingenious piece of hardware and software might save the small bookstore.

The Espresso Book Machine (EBM) is a print on demand (POD) machine that prints, collates, covers, and binds a single book (trade paperback) in a few minutes. The quality is surprisingly good–and the machine if fast.

Giants such as amazon and the rise of ebooks are stealing business away from small bookstores, which also cannot sustain the large inventories of larger box bookstores such as Chapters or Barns and Noble. The EBM is a way to cut costs and to have a huge inventory, as large as any electronic database of books can sustain. It also solves the problem of returns and how to supply out-of-print books.

Publishers such as Simon & Schuster and Hachette are setting up to provide all their titles for the EBM. Many other publishers will follow suit. It also brings to the bookstores people who wish to self-publish and have printed copies of their books, and most of the small indie publishers registered with Ingram who cannot afford to ship copies to bookstores.

The EBM has transparent walls so it’s possible to see a book being created from beginning to end, something most people never see.

Although it’s a pricey initial investment ($75-95,000), all university presses and bookstores that bought them fully believe they’ll recoup their investment in a few years.  Marcus Gipps, the Blackwell store manager in London, England, says that his customer base has increased since they brought in the machine; it has been dragging people away from their computers and into the store.

The number of university presses and bookstores that have Espresso Book machines is now up to 86:  http://www.ondemandbooks.com/our_ebm_locations.htm

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The Self-Publishing Dilemma

This week on Twitter’s #litchat was a discussion about “indie” authors, a euphemism now used instead of self-published authors, including those who start their own publishing company to sell their own books and those who use vanity publishing.

Indie publishing is touted as the new publishing model. Self-published authors claim that they are able to retain their own voice, that they are not constrained into a mold, that they are able to have control over all aspect of publishing the book, from writing it to marketing it. That’s all very well and good, but how about filtering?

In her article, When anyone can be a published author, Laura Brown asks the question. In all of the talk of the new publishing model, she argues that one element is being forgotten: the reader. How, amid potentially millions of self-published books, is one to find something good to read? Continue reading

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Read an ebook week

Until Saturday, 13 March, it’s again Read an ebook week, or as we fondly acronym it, REBW.

With Reader devices such as the Kindle, the Sony Reader, the Nook, the iPhone, and the upcoming iPad, ebooks have become increasingly popular as a medium for reading. If you’re an avid reader and love to own books, the ebook is ideal.

Yeah, yeah, I know, you love the feel and smell of a paper book. But you know what? Paper books take space. Lots of space. I currently have over two hundred books in my Sony Reader. At one inch a book (and that’s conservative), that’s 16 feet of shelf space.  Since I read on average three books a week, I’d add about 13 feet of shelf space a year to my bookshelf. Frankly, I don’t have enough walls for that.

I’ve been reading ebooks since they began, really, ten years ago. I haven’t abandoned the paper book; I consider each a different medium for words and both have their level of comfort. My Sony Reader fits in my purse easily. I take it with me when I wait at the doctor’s office or when I go to the park for a picnic. It’s ideal when I travel — I can take dozens of books with me and they weigh less than a pound. Plus, I feel righteous: I’m doing my bit to diminish my carbon footprint in the world.

If you’re not sure about which reader to buy, read this article at Wired.

Zumaya has jumped into ebookweek by offering free the complete text of five of their books, in .pdf format (which means they can be read on any device):

In the Service of Samurai by Gloria Oliver (YA Fantasy)

Synergy by M D Benoit (Science Fiction)

Kingdom of Dreams and Shadows by David Lynn Anderson (Fantasy)

Milky Way Marmalade by Michael DiCerto (Science Fiction)

The Dream Ender by Dorien Grey (Thriller)

You can also read excerpts of dozen of Zumaya Publications’ books at Scribd.

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