Tag Archives: Catalyst

February: Zumaya Thriller Month Kindle Sale

From Zumaya Publications:

For the month of February, Zumaya will be placing Thrillers and other genre work with thriller elements on SPECIAL!

All the titles below will be listed at the low price of $2.99. A great way to try out these great authors and fill out your Kindle libraries.

Week 1 Feb 5 – Feb 11 – Science Fiction Thrillers

 
 
Blood Line by Lynn Ward – Sample
Unforced Error by Mark Roberts – Sample
Catalyst by M D Benoit – Sample

Week 2 Feb 12 to Feb 18 – Thrillers

 
 
Final Mercy by Frank J Edwards – Sample
Redacted by G L Rockey – Sample
Too Many Secrets by Linda Guyan
Resurrection Diva by Eva Batonne –  Sample

Week 3 Feb 19 to Feb 25 – Fantasy Thrillers

 
 
The Mirror of Yu-Huang by Christine Norris – Sample
Vassal of El by Gloria Oliver – Sample

Week 4 Feb 26 to Mar 3 – Mixed Thrillers

 
 
The Ugly Princess by Elizabeth K Burton – Sample
Dark Legend by Chris Stires – Sample
Murder Canyon by Joan Blacher
P.S. All these listed titles are actually on sale from 5 February 2012 to 3 March 2012. We just have certain ones features each week.
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Official cover for Catalyst

The end–or the beginning– is in sight! This is the official cover of my new SF Thriller, Catalyst.

The year is 2046.

Mutations and MIDS ravage the planet, and the need for body parts and organ transplants escalate. Corbin has created GenOrg, a farm that speed-grows in coffin-like pods thousands of human clones from stolen DNA. One problem: the clones are sentient—their genetic memory has even given them the ability to communicate between themselves.

Ashar, a self-named clone, escapes GenOrg, promising to return to free the others. Running for his life, he is joined by Sara Logan, a geneticist with a guilty secret, and Pietr Ludov, a reporter seeking the ultimate story. They hatch out a plan to bring down Corbin, but it’s not enough for Ashar: he wants the clones free. Struggling with his own genetic identity, Ashar devises his own plan, which will unleash a series of events that will have repercussions for decades.

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Proofreading Catalyst

A rough sample of the Catalyst Cover

The final edits are done. The picture cover has been designed by Bob Hobbs. All that’s left to do is the cover setup (the font will hopefully change), the formatting of the book itself, and the final proofreading.

The proofreading is tough. Even though I’m pleased with the story and believe it’s well crafted, by now I’ve read the darn thing at least five times in the space of a few months and, frankly, I’m a bit sick of it.

Soon I’ll have to read it again, and this time it’s a different way of reading. This type of reading is at the same time mindless and extremely focused.

It’s mindless because you can’t afford to read the story. Reading for the story is a different mode of reading. If you’re a moderately fast reader, like I am, you read ahead and anticipate the words. Even though you read the words, your brain doesn’t “see” them; it sees the story, the characters, the action, the setting. The words –if the story is well written– weave a picture, a mental movie of what’s going on. Even in a literary work, this vision building is the goal of writing.

With proofreading, you must focus on every word. Forget the computer’s spell checker. You are the spell checker. You must look at every word and make sure each is spelled and used correctly. It becomes a witch hunt for any spelling mistakes and false friends like “it’s” and “its”, “they’re” and “their” and “there”, “who’s” and “whose”, etc. Every word is scrutinized. If you fall into the trap of beginning to read the story, you have to back up and start over.

Granted, at this point there shouldn’t be too many spelling mistakes, which makes it even more arduous because, let’s face it, reading words for the sake of words is tedious.

And as a writer, when I get to that point, I must fight the compulsion to fiddle with the words one last time before it’s too late. This is a bad idea for two reasons: first, because major changes at that point can greatly delay the publication of the book and second, because there are chances that I’ll make things worse. The story is completed. Let it be.

And very soon, I’ll be holding a copy in my hands. Can’t wait.

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