Tag Archives: carbon footprint

Read an ebook week

Until Saturday, 13 March, it’s again Read an ebook week, or as we fondly acronym it, REBW.

With Reader devices such as the Kindle, the Sony Reader, the Nook, the iPhone, and the upcoming iPad, ebooks have become increasingly popular as a medium for reading. If you’re an avid reader and love to own books, the ebook is ideal.

Yeah, yeah, I know, you love the feel and smell of a paper book. But you know what? Paper books take space. Lots of space. I currently have over two hundred books in my Sony Reader. At one inch a book (and that’s conservative), that’s 16 feet of shelf space.  Since I read on average three books a week, I’d add about 13 feet of shelf space a year to my bookshelf. Frankly, I don’t have enough walls for that.

I’ve been reading ebooks since they began, really, ten years ago. I haven’t abandoned the paper book; I consider each a different medium for words and both have their level of comfort. My Sony Reader fits in my purse easily. I take it with me when I wait at the doctor’s office or when I go to the park for a picnic. It’s ideal when I travel — I can take dozens of books with me and they weigh less than a pound. Plus, I feel righteous: I’m doing my bit to diminish my carbon footprint in the world.

If you’re not sure about which reader to buy, read this article at Wired.

Zumaya has jumped into ebookweek by offering free the complete text of five of their books, in .pdf format (which means they can be read on any device):

In the Service of Samurai by Gloria Oliver (YA Fantasy)

Synergy by M D Benoit (Science Fiction)

Kingdom of Dreams and Shadows by David Lynn Anderson (Fantasy)

Milky Way Marmalade by Michael DiCerto (Science Fiction)

The Dream Ender by Dorien Grey (Thriller)

You can also read excerpts of dozen of Zumaya Publications’ books at Scribd.

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Read an ebook Week — What is it about?

Every year for the past five years, around the beginning of March, eBooks are celebrated and promoted through Read an eBook Week. This year it is from March 8th to 14th. But what is it about?

Read an eBook week was first registered with Chase’s Calendar of events in 2004. “Read an EBook Week is a not-for-profit week set aside to inform the public about the pleasures and advantages of reading electronically. Authors, publishers, vendors, the media and readers world-wide […] join in the effort.” (http://ebookweek.com). During that week, publishers and authors offer specials (such as free eBooks) to entice the readers to try them. If you’ve never tried an eBook and have been intrigued by them, be sure to check the Read an eBook Week partners’ page (http://ebookweek.com/partners.html) for some good deals.

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Read and ebook week 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact Information:
Rita Toews

(204) 661-2734
r.toews@shaw.ca

website: http://www.domokos.com/readebookweek.html

How “Green” is Your Reading Material?

“Carbon Footprint”, “Environmentally Friendly” and “Green”. Have you considered these words when it comes to your reading material?

We’re encouraged to buy, use and dispose with the environment in mind. While it’s easy to recognize the negative impact of excess packaging and chemical content in many of the products we purchase, it’s not so easy when it comes to books, magazines and newspapers.

We do have alternatives other than paper for our reading material. Many books, newspapers and magazines are created electronically. No trees are cut to produce them. No ink is used to put the words on the page. No fossil fuel is used to run presses or trucks to move them around the country. Heated storage facilities are not required to warehouse e-books until they are shipped to bookstores.

March 2nd-8th, 2008 is Read An E-Book Week.

It takes 24 trees to produce a ton of printing paper, the type normally used for books, 12 trees are harvested for a ton of newsprint. Up to 35% of books printed for consumers (down from nearly 60% several years ago) are never read. They are used for window dressing in book stores, and eventually returned to the publisher for disposal in landfills. Given that a mature tree can produce as much oxygen in a season as 10 people inhale in a year, a serious alternative to paper books, magazines and newspapers needs to be considered. That alternative is e-books.

Before purchasing your next paper book, magazine or newspaper, consider your carbon footprint commitment. Read electronically.

Read An E-Book Week, March 9-15, 2008

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