Category Archives: Publishing

The Newest Jack Meter Novel is here!

Meter Parents, the newest in the Jack Meter Case Files  SF Mystery series, is now out and is available in Trade Paperback and ebook for Kindle and Nook.

Jack is suddenly stuck with babies. But are they really babies, or an expendable tool for someone else’s revenge?

Jack Meter’s hard-won peace is about to be shattered again. Two fugitives have descended on his apartment and are demanding help. They’re Phoenixes, a species that start as babies in the morning, age through the day and vanish after sunset, only to be reborn the next day.

Then there’s the Kayzar. The aliens want the Phoenixes back and are willing to kill anyone to recapture them, including Jack.

The Phoenixes’ story doesn’t ring true to Jack, but what’s a PI to do when his home is invaded, his friends feel sorry for the refugees, and he has a dead Kayzar stinking up his apartment?

The family is the test of freedom; because the family is the only thing that the free man makes for himself and by himself.— G. K. Chesterton

Read a sample.

“Jack Meter stays smart, sexy, and darkly funny—despite a new crop of aliens messing with his life. M.D. Benoit’s fast-paced and unique blend of science fiction and hardboiled detective will keep fans of both genres eagerly turning pages!” –Sherry D. Ramsey, editor of The Speculative Elements series

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Meter Parents published

Meter Parents

Jack is suddenly stuck with babies. But are they really babies, or an expendable tool for someone else’s revenge?

Jack Meter’s hard-won peace is about to be shattered again. Two fugitives have descended on his apartment and are demanding help. They’re Phoenixes, a species that start as babies in the morning, age through the day and vanish after sunset, only to be reborn the next day.

Then there’s the Kayzar. The aliens want the Phoenixes back and are willing to kill anyone to recapture them, including Jack.

The Phoenixes’ story doesn’t ring true to Jack, but what’s a PI to do when his home is invaded, his friends feel sorry for the refugees, and he has a dead Kayzar stinking up his apartment?

The family is the test of freedom; because the family is the only thing that the free man makes for himself and by himself.— G. K. Chesterton

Read a sample.

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Free Downloads

From noon EDT US today through midnight EDT Sunday (10 April 2011), Zumaya Publications is doing a free ebook promotion for Carole Waterhouse’s The Tapestry Baby and Mark Roberts’s Unforced Error.

You can download for free the two books in either PDF, epub or mobi:

For Tapestry Baby:

Tapestry Baby PDF

Tapestry Baby EPUB

Tapestry Baby MOBI

 

For Unforced Error:

Unforced Error PDF

Unforced Error EPUB 

Unforced Error MOBI

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Official cover for Catalyst

The end–or the beginning– is in sight! This is the official cover of my new SF Thriller, Catalyst.

The year is 2046.

Mutations and MIDS ravage the planet, and the need for body parts and organ transplants escalate. Corbin has created GenOrg, a farm that speed-grows in coffin-like pods thousands of human clones from stolen DNA. One problem: the clones are sentient—their genetic memory has even given them the ability to communicate between themselves.

Ashar, a self-named clone, escapes GenOrg, promising to return to free the others. Running for his life, he is joined by Sara Logan, a geneticist with a guilty secret, and Pietr Ludov, a reporter seeking the ultimate story. They hatch out a plan to bring down Corbin, but it’s not enough for Ashar: he wants the clones free. Struggling with his own genetic identity, Ashar devises his own plan, which will unleash a series of events that will have repercussions for decades.

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The Self-Publishing Dilemma

This week on Twitter’s #litchat was a discussion about “indie” authors, a euphemism now used instead of self-published authors, including those who start their own publishing company to sell their own books and those who use vanity publishing.

Indie publishing is touted as the new publishing model. Self-published authors claim that they are able to retain their own voice, that they are not constrained into a mold, that they are able to have control over all aspect of publishing the book, from writing it to marketing it. That’s all very well and good, but how about filtering?

In her article, When anyone can be a published author, Laura Brown asks the question. In all of the talk of the new publishing model, she argues that one element is being forgotten: the reader. How, amid potentially millions of self-published books, is one to find something good to read? Continue reading

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