Monthly Archives: March 2007

The Truth about Monsters

This is a wonderful poem from Patrick O’Leary. Makes you think. Thanks to Derryl Murphy, fellow SF Canada author, for pointing me to it.

The Truth about Monsters

I have never seen a unicorn
and neither have you
so shut the fuck up.

I have never been chased by a zombie,
bitten by a vampire, or fled from a werewolf,
and neither have you
so shut the fuck up.

When people die? They’re dead.
They are not undead.
They are dead dead.
They do not walk the night;
They rot and become mulch.

You know why you’ve never seen a ghost
and I’ve never seen a ghost?
That’s right: There are no ghosts.
So shut the fuck up.

If you are 25 million years old
you may have seen a dinosaur
but you’re not and you didn’t
so shut the fuck up.

Now let’s talk about dragons.
Creatures who breathe fire
are barbecue. End of story.

Start of truth.
There are indeed monsters in this world.
And, yes, we have all seen them.
But, really, if you want to talk about monsters
do you really need the scales and the fangs?

Talk about moms and dads,
aunts and uncles,
who have broken the innocence of children,
who create facsimiles of their monstrous selves,
delayed detonations which explode years later.

Talk about the tall tales we tell ourselves
about those dark strangers
who strangle miniature beauty queens,
who lie in wait, always out there,
in the woods, on the web,
dark strangers who wait anywhere
but under our roofs,
wait to tuck us in, anywhere but here,
anywhere but home.

The truth is there’s only one way to kill a monster.
You tell it the truth.

You do not say, “Now just a moment.
I understand the war on terror
is a global commitment requiring great sacrifice
and significant resources–more resources, in fact,
than we spend on children, health care, education and the poor,
but let us explore the nuances.”

No.
No.
No.
You say “You, Sir, are a lying sack of shit.
Now shut the fuck up.”

And sometimes, you must resort to caprice. For sometimes
the only way to tell the truth to a monster
is to disguise it in a form it recognizes
but does not identify with.
You call it a zombie, a vampire, a werewolf or a dragon.
And you wake up every morning,
look in the mirror and check for tails, scales and fangs.
And when you tilt your head back to gargle
you watch for sparks.

Patrick O’Leary

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Interview

An (interesting, I dare say) interview in the Scriptorium with me.

I didn’t know about this great ezine, but after having roamed through the pages, I think it’s one of the best around. I immediately subscribed to it. If you’re a writer, aspiring or otherwise, this is an ezine you should definitely add to your reading collection.

Subscribe to the Scriptorium.

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Second Stop on Synergy Book Tour

After Heidi’s Pick Six, which was a lot of fun, I’m now stopping at Joshua Palmatier’s blog for the day, where he’ll post an interview with me that he did.

I recently read Joshua’s The Cracked Throne, which I thought was fantastic (pun intended). You can read a review here.

So, here’s the scoop on Joshua:

JP

Joshua Palmatier

Joshua Palmatier was born in Coudersport, PA, but since his father was in the military he moved around. Alot. He’s lived in the states of Pennsylvania (three times), Florida (twice), Washington, California (briefly), Virginia, Texas (twice), and now resides in upstate New York. He has spent the majority of his life so far going to school, earning a Bachelors of Science and a Master of Arts degree in mathematics from the Pennsylvania State University, followed by a PhD in mathematics from Binghamton University. He is currently teaching mathematics (what else) at Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, and taught for three years at Bloomsburg University while taking a break between his masters degree and the PhD.

Joshua started writing science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories in the eighth grade, when the teacher assigned a one page short story. He wrote a story about Atlantis. It was from the perspective of one of the inhabitants as he escaped in a spaceship, watching his world being destroyed by water from one of the viewports of the ship. He got an A. Joshua has never stopped writing since, mainly focusing on novels.

The Skewed Throne is Joshua’s first published novel, but it’s the fourth novel he’s written. The sequel, The Cracked Throne was published in 2006, and The Vacant Throne will soon follow. You can email him at jpalmatier@sff.net

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Second Stop on Synergy Book Tour

After Heidi’s Pick Six, which was a lot of fun, I’m now stopping at Joshua Palmatier’s blog for the day, where he’ll post an interview with me that he did.

I recently read Joshua’s The Cracked Throne, which I thought was fantastic (pun intended). You can read a review here.

So, here’s the scoop on Joshua:

JP

Joshua Palmatier

Joshua Palmatier was born in Coudersport, PA, but since his father was in the military he moved around. Alot. He’s lived in the states of Pennsylvania (three times), Florida (twice), Washington, California (briefly), Virginia, Texas (twice), and now resides in upstate New York. He has spent the majority of his life so far going to school, earning a Bachelors of Science and a Master of Arts degree in mathematics from the Pennsylvania State University, followed by a PhD in mathematics from Binghamton University. He is currently teaching mathematics (what else) at Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania, and taught for three years at Bloomsburg University while taking a break between his masters degree and the PhD.

Joshua started writing science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories in the eighth grade, when the teacher assigned a one page short story. He wrote a story about Atlantis. It was from the perspective of one of the inhabitants as he escaped in a spaceship, watching his world being destroyed by water from one of the viewports of the ship. He got an A. Joshua has never stopped writing since, mainly focusing on novels.

The Skewed Throne is Joshua’s first published novel, but it’s the fourth novel he’s written. The sequel, The Cracked Throne was published in 2006, and The Vacant Throne will soon follow. You can email him at jpalmatier@sff.net

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